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from Jazz Festival

By John Blake, CNN

"Jazz is dead."

Jazz connoisseurs have been hearing that eulogy for at least half a century. They're a picky bunch, often complaining about the quality of contemporary jazz while pointing to some golden era when "real" jazz thrived.
    But if jazz did indeed die, what was the cause of death, and when did it pass away?
    A new book, "Jazz Festival: Jim Marshall," offers some possible answers. It features a handsome collection of black-and-white photos of jazz icons playing for and mingling with the glamorous crowds at the Monterey Jazz Festival in the early 1960s. The photos were taken by the legendary music photographer Jim Marshall, who captured those final summers when jazz was still widely popular -- and when it started to lose its commercial appeal.
    Johnny Hodges

    "Jazz Festival" named by American Photo to its list  of "Best Photography Books Fall 2016."

    Reel Art Press is proud to present Jazz Festival: Jim Marshall, a perfect tribute to the legendary photographer.

    Leica Store Miami Presents An Exhibit of Unseen Photos From Legendary Photographer Jim Marshall's New Book "THE HAIGHT: Love, Rock, and Revolution."

    The photography of Jim Marshall book tour continues in Miami, FL. A gallery show, book-signing and talk by Jim Marshall Photography LLC's Amelia Davis is scheduled for Wednesday, December 3, 2014, 7:00pm–9:30pm - Leica Store Miami.

    The Charlatans perform in the Golden Gate Park , 1967

    VF Culture: Suddenly That Summer.

    It was billed as “the Summer of Love,” a blast of glamour, ecstasy, and Utopianism that drew some 75,000 young people to the San Francisco streets in 1967. Who were the true movers behind the Haight-Ashbury happening that turned America on to a whole new age?