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Quicksilver Messenger Service

Before he was a famous rock photographer, Jim Marshall photographed jazz, covering the festivals in Newport, Rhode Island and Monterey, California in the 1960s and photographing the biggest stars along with their deeply hip audience. Jazz Festival: Jim Marshall, published recently by Reel Art Press in collaboration with the Jim Marshall Archive, collects some 600 of Marshall’s black and white images made between 1960 and 1966, most of them previously unpublished.

Omar Clay

Oh yeah - Reel Art Press does it again! The Estate of Jim Marshall is pleased to announce the launch of "Jim Marshall: Jazz Festival" (Reel Art Press, September, 2016). We lost a true hard-working character when Jim died, and we thank Amelia Davis for her dedication to keeping his work out there, and editing such a rich and fabulous book (and for letting me make an edit for this story! Thank you!) The book covers six years of Monterey and Newport Jazz Festivals, on stage and behind the scenes, and is chock-a-block with pics.

Paul Gonsalves and Duke Ellington-1961

The best photographs linger in the mind even after you shut your eyes. It's the same with great jazz songs, whose melodies seem to stay awhile, even after the last note sounds. In both, there's a sense of eternity, which is why the marriage of the two — as in the jazz images of photograper Jim Marshall can seem timeless.

Omar Clay

By Paul Liberatore, Marin Independent Journal

Whenever there’s mention of the work of the late San Francisco photographer Jim Marshall, the first thing most people think of is rock ’n’ roll. A pioneering rock photographer, he was famous for his iconic images of Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, the Grateful Dead and many other bands and musicians from the heyday of rock in the late 1960s and ’70s.

from Jazz Festival

By John Blake, CNN

"Jazz is dead."

Jazz connoisseurs have been hearing that eulogy for at least half a century. They're a picky bunch, often complaining about the quality of contemporary jazz while pointing to some golden era when "real" jazz thrived.
    But if jazz did indeed die, what was the cause of death, and when did it pass away?
    A new book, "Jazz Festival: Jim Marshall," offers some possible answers. It features a handsome collection of black-and-white photos of jazz icons playing for and mingling with the glamorous crowds at the Monterey Jazz Festival in the early 1960s. The photos were taken by the legendary music photographer Jim Marshall, who captured those final summers when jazz was still widely popular -- and when it started to lose its commercial appeal.
    Jazz Festival cover photo

    The Guardian: Jazz was the catalyst for change': Jim Marshall’s images of 60s festivals

    by Sean O'Hagan

    “Jim was a guy you either loved or hated, there was no in-between,” says Amelia Davis, Jim Marshall’s erstwhile assistant and now archivist. “If he loved you, he would lie down in front of a truck for you. If he hated you, he would happily drive the truck over you.”

    Jazz Festival cover photo

    BBC Arts: Black and white and heard all over: How Jim Marshall shot the jazz festivals of the 1960s.

    Jazz Festival: Jim Marshall is a lavish new book celebrating the legendary rock photographer's early work at the Newport and Monterey Jazz Festivals of the 1960s. Some 600 black-and-white images, most previously unseen, capture not only the musical icons of the time, but the freedom, excitement and intimacy of the events, whose integrated crowds led the way for the civil rights movement. ALLAN CAMPBELL introduces a selection of Marshall's best shots.

    IPPY Gold Medal

    "The Haight" Wins IPPY Gold Medal Award

    The Independent Publisher announced its 2015 Independent Publisher Regional and Ebook Awards, presented to the year's best titles, which include "The Haight: Love, Rock, and Revolution.

    Another rave review of "The Haight."